Category Archives: ITAR

March 28, 2017

D.C. Circuit Strikes Down Challenge to Application of ITAR Brokering Regulations to Practicing Attorneys

by Gwen Green and Amani S. Floyd

On March 14, 2017, the D.C. Circuit dismissed a law firm’s challenge to the State Department’s application of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”) Part 129 brokering provisions against practicing attorneys.  In its lawsuit, law firm Matthew A. Goldstein, PLLC (“Goldstein”) alleged that the State Department lacked constitutional and statutory authority to apply Part 129 to legal services provided to its clients and sought declaratory and injunctive relief to prevent the State Department from applying the brokering provisions to the firm.[1]

Regulation of Brokering Activities

The State Department regulates international arms brokering under the Arms Export Control Act (“AECA”) and the ITAR.  The AECA mandates that “every person . . . who engages in the business of brokering activities with respect to the manufacture, export, import, or transfer of any defense article or defense service” shall register with the State Department and obtain a license before engaging in “the business of brokering activities.”[2]  The AECA further provides that “brokering activities shall include the financing, transportation, freight forwarding, or taking of any other action that facilitates the manufacture, export, or import of a defense article or defense service.”[3]  These requirements are implemented and further defined at Part 129 of the ITAR. Continue reading

February 27, 2016

DDTC Elevates Lisa Aguirre to Managing Director

by Steven Pelak and Gwen Green

HandshakingOn January 20, 2016, the U.S. Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (“DDTC”) announced the elevation of Lisa Aguirre to the position of Managing Director. Although DDTC has used the title of Managing Director in the past, this new role has different responsibilities from those held by previous Managing Directors.

As Managing Director, Ms. Aguirre will serve as deputy to the Deputy Assistant Secretary (“DAS”), acting when the DAS is unavailable, and dividing the DDTC front office responsibilities with the DAS. Prior to this appointment, Ms. Aguirre most recently served as Director of the Office of Defense Trade Controls Management.  DAS Brian Nilsson has made an excellent and outstanding choice in his selection of Ms. Aguirre.

In light of emerging threats to U.S. national security, it is particularly important to have a judicious decision maker with a strong background in arms export controls such as Ms. Aguirre in such a critical position at DDTC. Ms. Aguirre has deep experience and knowledge in the AECA, the ITAR, and the role various law enforcement agencies and the intelligence community play in export controls.  She understands well the important role of DDTC’s enforcement function in safeguarding the superiority of U.S. military technology, particularly with regard to constant efforts by the Chinese, Russian, and Iranian governments to obtain U.S. military technology.  With the promotion of Ms. Aguirre and the October 2015 appointment of a new Deputy Assistant Secretary, DDTC has turned a corner.  Under such professional and informed leadership, DDTC undoubtedly will serve the People effectively, independently, and wisely.

June 3, 2015

Export Control Reform Marches On: DDTC and BIS Publish Proposed Rules to Harmonize Key Definitions in the ITAR and EAR

by Gwen Green

Internet Security SystemOn June 3, 2015, the U.S. Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (“DDTC”) and the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) published proposed rules to amend the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”) and the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”) to harmonize key definitions and terms between the two regulations. The proposed rules are a part of the continuing Export Control Reform (“ECR”) initiative to enhance U.S. national and economic security, facilitate compliance with export controls, and streamline the U.S. export control system.

Harmonization of Definitions Between ITAR and EAR

DDTC and BIS have identified a series of similar terms in the ITAR and the EAR that are defined differently and that warrant either harmonization or the creation of similar structures that would identify more unambiguously the differences in how similar concepts are treated under the two regulations.  DDTC proposes to therefore revise the ITAR’s definitions of the terms “defense article,” “defense services,” “technical data,” “public domain,” “export,” and “reexport or retransfer,” and create definitions for the terms “required,” “technical data that arises during, or results from, fundamental research,” “release,” “retransfer,” and “activities that are not exports, reexports, or retransfers.” Likewise, BIS proposes amendments to the EAR regarding the definitions of the terms “technology,” “required,” “peculiarly responsible,” “proscribed person,” “published,” results of “fundamental research,” “export,” “reexport,” “release,” “transfer,” and “transfer (in-country).”

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May 29, 2015

Open for Business: State Issues Final Rule to Allow Defense Exports to Fiji

by Gwen Green

FijiOn May 29, 2015, the U.S. Department of State issued a final rule amending the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”) to rescind its previous policy of denying the export of defense articles and defense services to Fiji.  The final rule, effective May 29, 2015, comes approximately eight months after Fiji held the first democratic elections in the country since retired Rear Adm. Voreqe Bainimarama seized control in a military coup in 2006.

The Multinational Observer Group (“MOG”), representing 14 countries including the United States, was invited by the acting Fijian Government to observe the September 2014 parliamentary elections, which resulted in the landslide victory of Bainimarama’s Fiji First Party.  In April 2015, the MOG released its final report on the Fijian elections finding, “The outcome of the 2014 Fijian Election broadly represented the will of the Fijian voters.  The conditions were in place for Fijians to exercise their right to vote freely.”

In the final rule, the Department of State explained it has therefore determined it is in the best interests of U.S. foreign policy, national security, and human rights concerns to rescind its previous policy of denying defense exports to Fiji.

May 26, 2015

DDTC Publishes Proposed Changes to Registration and Licensing of U.S. Persons Providing Defense Services to Non-U.S. Persons

by Gwen Green

subscribe icon write signOn May 26, 2015, the U.S. Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (“DDTC”) published a proposed rule to amend the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”) to clarify requirements for the registration and licensing of U.S. persons providing defense services while employed by non-U.S. employers.

The proposed rule would require U.S. “natural persons”, who furnish defense services to and/or on behalf of their non-U.S. employer, whether in the United States or abroad, to register with the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (“DDTC”), unless their non-U.S. employer is an ITAR-registered entity or is listed on the ITAR registration statement of a U.S. parent or other U.S.-affiliate entity.  In the proposed rule, the term “natural person” is defined as an individual human being, as distinguished from a corporation, business association, partnership, society, trust, or any other entity, organization or group.

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